Step 289: When saying something difficult to someone you love, use ‘and’ instead of ‘but’

adulting:

This is a very simple but and very important concept. (See what I did there?) These two phrases would be heard very differently:

“I love you but I need you to respect my boundaries.”

“I love you and I need you to respect my boundaries.”

The word ‘but’ negates whatever came before it, while the word ‘and’ signifies that whatever comes next is a logical extension of the thought. 

(via hippoplatypus)

trailerparkofmydreams:

Teeth on edge - Henry IV
Knock,knock! Who’s there? - Macbeth
Fight fire with fire - King John
Vanish into thin air - Othello
What’s done is done - Macbeth
The game is up - Cymbelline
Seen better days - Timon of Athens
Green-eyed monster - The Merchant of Venice
Out of the jaws of death - Twelfth Night
A sorry sight - Macbeth
Wear your heart on a sleeve = Othello
A piece of work - Hamlet
Laughing stock - The Merry Wives of Windsor
Come what may - Macbeth 
For goodness sake - Henry VIII
Full circle - King Lear
The world is one’s oyster - The Merry Wives of Windsor
Love is blind - The  Merchant of Venice
Makes your hair stand up on end - Hamlet
Too much of a good thing - As You Like It
Brave new world - The Tempest

Also, “eyeballs”- A Midsummer Night’s Dream
"puking"- As You Like It
"skim milk"- Henry IV
"obscene"- Love’s Labours Lost
"hot-blooded"- King Lear
"the game is afoot"- Henry IV
"epileptic"- King Lear
"wormholes"- The Rape of Lucrece
"alligator"- Romeo and Juliet

trailerparkofmydreams:

Teeth on edge - Henry IV

Knock,knock! Who’s there? - Macbeth

Fight fire with fire - King John

Vanish into thin air - Othello

What’s done is done - Macbeth

The game is up - Cymbelline

Seen better days - Timon of Athens

Green-eyed monster - The Merchant of Venice

Out of the jaws of death - Twelfth Night

A sorry sight - Macbeth

Wear your heart on a sleeve = Othello

A piece of work - Hamlet

Laughing stock - The Merry Wives of Windsor

Come what may - Macbeth 

For goodness sake - Henry VIII

Full circle - King Lear

The world is one’s oyster - The Merry Wives of Windsor

Love is blind - The  Merchant of Venice

Makes your hair stand up on end - Hamlet

Too much of a good thing - As You Like It

Brave new world - The Tempest

Also, “eyeballs”- A Midsummer Night’s Dream

"puking"- As You Like It

"skim milk"- Henry IV

"obscene"- Love’s Labours Lost

"hot-blooded"- King Lear

"the game is afoot"- Henry IV

"epileptic"- King Lear

"wormholes"- The Rape of Lucrece

"alligator"- Romeo and Juliet

(via alanna-rae)